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Sculpting pendants with copper wire, stones and a soldering iron

A passion I have in addition to paint on glass is sculpting. I have found that with the soldering iron I can get instant results and the working process is very intuitive. I love that!

The idea of my kinetic pendant series comes from a customer requesting to have a small piece of a meteorite set as a pendant. The idea I got was to create a cage so that I would not have to modify the rock. It would lie loose inside of a cage and move as the pendant moved. This pendant never became a reality but my brain was allready fed with an idea so I continued working on this concept.

I liked the idea of moving stones, so continuing on that line I thought maybe stones threaded on a metal wire could be interesting. I know there’s a lot of persons who like to fiddle with something while they talk, watch TV or do other things that doesn’t occupy their hands. I wanted to create a pendant for them that could be beautiful and playful at the same time.

This idea have resulted a cage pendant with a wire in the middle where I thread a few stones that can slide up and down as you move the pendant. It hangs from a long chain so it’s easy to hold in the hand in a relaxed and natural way. I make them with different gemstones as amethyst, red and orange coral, rose quartz and more.

To see more of these fun and beautiful necklaces click this link: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BGLASSbcn?ref=seller-platform-mcnav&section_id=12305690

 

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New design for nature lovers

I’ve been working on this design for a while, and feel excited to finally have it listed in my etsy shop. I love the nature myself so it’s kind of natural that my inspiration comes from there in many of my pieces.

When I started designing this pendant, I wanted to make a glass cabochon with the shape of a rain drop. The rain drop was my starting point. The way the cabochon is made also has to do with drops; the green shades are made dripping green enamel into the wet white enamel so the green expands nicely and halfly mix into the white.

I wanted to make a big pendant, to be worn over a top or a jumper perfect for cooler weather, but I didn’t want it to be too heavy. The idea of letting the drop fall from a cloud makes the drop look more like a rain drop and not just any drop, so it was clear that I needed a cloud.

After a lot of drawing and thinking and more drawing the final result became what you can see in the image below.

If you want to see more images you can click on this link: https://www.etsy.com/listing/555321232/statement-pendant-necklace-cloud-pendant?ref=shop_home_active_16

 

stained glass jewelry, cloud pendant

 

Some new techniques I worked on lately

Since I acquired a solder iron some months ago I have fallen in love with that tool. I love how it allows working in a spontaneous way. The melted solder can almost be sculpted to three-dimensional shapes and then if slightly exceeding the heat everything is gone. It’s quite compelling just learing how it works in my hands.

I have used this technique in combination with my fused glass and I’m thrilled with the results. I have learned a lot during these months and it has opened a whole new world to me and my work, letting me experiment with new shapes and materials.

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This ring is created with copper wire, fused glass and tin solder, all soldered to an adjustable brass ring.  A patina gives the dark finish, bringing out the textures in metal. https://www.etsy.com/BGLASSbcn/listing/534305379/rough-rustic-ring-flower-ring-gift-for?ref=shop_home_active_24

 

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https://www.etsy.com/BGLASSbcn/listing/472566112/unique-cloud-artisan-boho-long-necklace?ref=shop_home_active_26

 

New lovely pieces getting born

Every kiln fire is related to a lot of excitement and worries. Working with recycled glass makes the risk of failure a bit greater since I do not know the origin of the glass. I sometimes experience that some of the glass cabochons are devitrified and often that happens because of the composition of the glass. I have no way to find out before firing so I try not to make too many.

I also think the relative air humidity has got something to do. Like when the humidity is high the walls of the kiln and the furnitures get humid. I have found that drying out the air with a dehumidifier some hours before the fire is working quite well.

Still there are always pieces of fused  glass that come out just perfect and that compensate for the bad ones 🙂

Exploring new tecniques

Today I want to explain you a new discovery I’ve had (at least it’s new for me).

For a long time I’ve been looking for a way to make fine lines on the glass and with a certain level of control. The brush never works out fine enough especially painting the tiny earrings, so I gave that up. I’ve also tried a special pen for glazes, but the glaze got stuck all the time so neither a good solution.

For a long time I’ve had the idea that I would like to try with a good old dip pen, but in fear of wasting more time I didn’t try it yet. But the other day, looking for something else I found one of those nibs and it’s pen holder. So I didn’t have any excuse to not try it anymore.

I tried the nib pen with my glazes and it works great! It was such a nice discovery and I thought I would share it with all of you.

It gives a very fresh expression. I just love it!

Take a look at the results 🙂

butterfly pendant
Butterfly pendant

 

Dragonfly ring
Dragonfly ring
Love jewelry set
Love forever…

 

Do we lose the art when we grow up?

When I look at drawings and paintings made by small children, I always get so amazed by the sincerity in these little artworks. In the simplest way children are able to show exactly what they have in their mind. They are the masters of simplification. I admire this ability that seems to be so natural in kids.

If we ask a bunch of kids if they would like to play with clay for a while, I can’t imagine any of them saying no to this offer. My experience is that they’d rather fight for a lump of clay, and once they’ve got it in their hands they’ll start squeezing and work it with great enthusiasm. In general they seem to very much enjoy the process and not worry so much about the result. (And of course they don’t mind at all to get dirty.) They work concentrated with the clay until, suddenly, voilá, finished and perfect. The younger they are the less critical they are to their result. And we, the adults, look at it, and ask: “What is it?”

Did you ever say to your self : “I wish I was a little more creative” or “I don’t have any creativity”? I think many of us have had that thought, and I think it’s a very normal attitude in adults. So what happens to us between that moment of creative joy and this resigned attitude?

When we grow, they teach us to draw what we see, but in a realistic way. We learn that the drawing has to look like the reality with its corresponding perspective, light and shadow. So we kind of forget what was the real reason we wanted to draw in the first place. A child can easily get discouraged by constant correction and criticism. The satisfaction of expressing themselves is getting reduced when they are forced to put more focus on the result. The pressure can get so hard to deal with that the child eventually stop drawing. I believe this is the moment we start to disconnect from our creativity.

So maybe the level of creativity in us adults is about our mindset towards our own creativity. I think it’s easier to reach a creative state of mind if we are not afraid to be judged or to fail. If we can free ourselves from the: “What will the others say about this?” we have come a long way ahead.

I also think that our creativity is something we have to take care of, we have to keep it alive. I’d like to compare it to a houseplant. If it gets water, light and nutrition it will grow healthy, and sometimes even bloom. What does it take to get our creativity to grow? A creative person has the senses open and is always looking for something inspiring. My experience is also that the more I create the more creative I feel. It’s like one idea leads to another, and the ball starts rolling. But I think the most important is to free ourselves from the fear of failing and just let the ball roll.

Here are two examples of children’s drawings, that for me are indeed inspiring! They are highly intuitive but yet so descriptive, showing a great ability for observation and focus.

4776269616_41d032f88dphoto credit: Charlie’s Farm via photopin (license)

3051839117_af248e6af0photo credit: A Happy Pussy Cat – Drawing via photopin (license)